It’s Almost NaNoWriMo Time!

It’s Almost NaNoWriMo Time!

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My boss ran the Chicago Marathon last week. Apparently she does this every year. I learned about this astounding feat of athleticism a day or two after the race, and told her how awesome I thought it was.

“Oh,” she said,” I run it in like 6 or 7 hours, though. Not very impressive.”

“But you finished!” I said, still amazed to learn this information.  “You ran a marathon! You ran 26 miles. I…

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Tags: NaNoWriMo

anneursu:

My friend Christine Heppermann’s book POISONED APPLES: POEMS FOR YOU MY PRETTY released this week. This collection is an unabashedly feminist look at girls, body image, and eating disorders told through the lens of fairy tales, designed for young adults.

The book is arriving at an interesting…

Isn’t this really the marker of adulthood? Learning to look beyond yourself to others? Isn’t a marker of intelligence a hunger to see the world outside your own experience? Isn’t that maybe why so many people outside of traditional power structures are draw to this lit in the first place? Everyone who insults reading these books is not just denigrating the quality of the books themselves, but of the very act of using your time to give a crap about kids and the things they give a crap about.”

party-wok:

AMAZON, SHOW US THE MEANING OF HASTE

party-wok:

AMAZON, SHOW US THE MEANING OF HASTE

(Source: lolfactory, via notyourstereotypicallibrarian)

This is the funniest thing I’ve seen all week.

(via annamays)

teacherjoe said: When you read the Narnia books, do you start with "The Magician's Nephew" or do you start with "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe"? I've read many places that you read them to your children, and I was curious about where you started.

akmargie:

neil-gaiman:

I always start with The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, because otherwise you would read it already knowing who Aslan is and what Narnia is. It’s much more fun hitting The Magician’s Nephew afterwards and learning the backstory in the way that C.S. Lewis learned it. (In my opinion, of course. Your mileage may vary.)

Neil Gaiman and my mom agree with me on this very important point.

No but seriously. this. If you read “The Magician’s Nephew” last then there is this beautiful moment where you realize about the apple and the wardrobe and it’s wonderful and magical and if you read it first then when Lucy discovers the wardrobe you’re just like… yeah— saw that coming. 

hellokristenx:

chamelion-circuit:

amordelfriki:

prokopetz:

prokopetz:

Rape is the only crime on the books for which arguing that the temptation to commit it was too clear and obvious to resist is treated as a defence. For every other crime, we call that a confession.

I’ve gotten more angry asks about this post than I have actual reblogs.

I literally put my coffee down, stared at the screen and said “Holy shit…”

Fuck.

this is still my favorite post ever

(via lauriehalseanderson)

"Hold my fucking hand, loser. We’re using the buddy system for the rest of our lives."

— How I’m going to propose   (via bewwbs)

(Source: keepmywhiskeyneat, via tree-advice)

bigbardafree:

not-safe-for-earth:

lavandulum:

i’ve stopped trash talking comic sans after learning the font is actually one of the only dyslexia-friendly fonts that come standard with most computers and i advocate for others doing the same

In the event that you would like to…

weneeddiversebooks:

What Chiamanda highlights is that seeing yourself in stories can be essential to how one perceives beauty, expectations, and life, especially at a young age.